Paste to SETTINGS -> ADVANCED -> CODE INJECTION -> HEADER-field

Let's Not Capture This Moment

It was the perfect moment. Twelve writers sitting around a make shift round table, caps off the bottles of rum and white wine that half filled most of our glasses as the evening got underway. The sun had already disappeared with dim bulbs and a few sparsely placed candles providing more than enough light for us to read. And then it started. One by one each writer read pieces they had created; some that day, others the week prior, others still years before. Collectively we listened, applauded, criticized, and praised each work and how they were delivered. We launched in to discussions about meaning, symbolism, alliteration, all things only a group committed to the art could understand and appreciate. Everyone spoke and everyone listened. And when the moment ended three hours later it left a connection silently acknowledged by all. A connections shared through our common passion for the art of expression.

The entire night was inspiring, and through it all not one single picture.

I couldn't believe it myself. No one tried to gather everyone in a corner to create the perfect Instagram post. No one took pictures of the bottles of alcohol spread out around the tables. We were all deeply infused in the moment, engaged by our own words, our own thoughts, without even the slightest preoccupation of capturing the moment.

But the moment is still vivid in my memory. I can still feel the emotions of that evening without having to visit my twitter stream. We lived it. Every second of it. And it still means just as much

There is something liberating about the ephemeral. Knowing no matter how amazing or how crippling a moment, that "this too shall end." You are free to be free. To embrace that moment and then let it go. No picture can ever capture that. *******************************************************************

Read "Thoughts of a Fractured Soul," a tragedy of family, failed potential, and the Millennial struggle with ambition, expectation and the fight for independence.

Available in print and e-book format at www.kerncarter.com.

Now What....

Last week I went to speak at a Fundraiser specifically aimed at investing in youth culture. While it was a great honour to be invited to speak, the most fulfilling part of the night came in a side conversation I had with a gentlemen who was just curious about what I did. We spoke in all for about twenty minutes, but the most memorable part of the dialogue was the question he posed: "now what?"

Only two words, but oh so powerful. To add some perspective, the conversation was geared around how we as leaders could use our voice to uplift not only youth, but different members of our community. We spoke about running different camps, doing appearances and speeches, and a bunch of different outreach projects that could possibly have a positive impact. I was kind of feeling myself, the way I do when I make a few good points that garners some head nods and rising eyebrows. But near the end of the conversation he asked me "and now what?" AND NOW WHAT?

"What are you going to do? - What is your one appearance for two hours, or your yearly summer camp for two weeks, or your one hour book reading - how is that truly going to make a difference in the day-to-day life of the people you hope to touch?"

I paused for a while and thought about some clever response about "making a lasting impression" and "if I could touch just one person" blah blah blah. But I didn't say anything, couldn't really say anything. It was too real of a moment and I felt it required contemplation rather than input.

The question is simple...And now what? And now what, Kern? What am I going to do? How will I truly make an indent on the lives of everyone that hears my voice or reads my words. How will I make my voice powerful enough so my words stay with them every single day of their lives? 

The question has stuck with me, and those of you reading to get an answer will be sadly disappointed. I am still contemplating. I haven't completely figured it out yet but I know once I do my mark will be deep.

Lessons are learned everywhere, at any time. The mind just has to be open to receive them.

Why 25 is the New 50

When I turned 25 I remember feeling severely depressed that I hadn't accomplished all of my goals and that my life wasn't exactly how I had imagined it years prior as an eager university graduate. I felt like a failure, like if my time to be successful had almost run out. I thought I was alone in this, but apparently I was wrong. When finally opening up about my depression to other Millennial aged friends and colleagues, they said they had experienced some of the same feelings. At first I was excited to know that I wasn't crazy, but then I thought about how insane I really was for believing that not being financially stable in a career I love by my mid twenties meant that I was a failure.

I wondered what could have lead to this thinking and didn't have to look past the current culture that has been created; the NOW culture where news is instantaneous and stories of millionaire and billionaire tech start ups gives the illusion of normalcy. A culture where impatience is a virtue and if you're not up to date with the new social media trend then you're not up to date.

I had to seriously look at myself, analyze where I was in my personal life and my career; then strategize where I wanted to be. I had to rid myself of the notion that 25 is the new middle age and push past the culture that engulfed my thoughts.

When I did this, I was able to focus on all that I had already accomplished. I told myself that although I still had a lot to do, I should be proud of what I had already done. My mind became clear and I let the culture motivate me instead of intimidate me. I knew how I would impact the world and set out on a mission to do just that.

Maybe 25 is the new 50 in this wild world. But my journey isn't defined by age, it's defined by impact. And I plan to continue impacting the world one day at a time until I'm one with the earth.

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